Posts tagged microsites

Why Marketing Artists and Marketing Scientists Need One Another

v. man 250x250 Why Marketing Artists and Marketing Scientists Need One Another

Mark McGuinness of Lateral Action guest posted a terrific blog at Copyblogger: Are You a Marketing Artist or Scientist? In it he describes two distinct tribes that most marketers fall into (1) the right-brain types that like to create and find inspiration in coffee shops journaling and brainstorming about their next blog, podcast, video or creation or (2) the left-brain types that are most on fire when they get to use gadgets to crunch numbers, run split tests or compare data sets.

McGuinness explains it matters not which camp you fall into. What matters is that both camps work closely together to achieve optimum marketing outcomes for your organization. While ethereal writers can create magnetic content in itself it isn’t marketing until the scientists optimize it to be found and shared on the web.

And while marketing scientists are terrific at setting up variable data projects,analysis models and optimizing content to be keyword and SEO rich and for capturing names and IP addresses via landing pages and micro sites, they aren’t good at creating copy or content that screams read me, share me, and use me to make your buying decision right now!

You Need Both Disciplines to Succeed

McGuinness goes on to say that while at one time you could succeed with just killer content or killer PPC, now you need a mixture of the art and science to succeed. Dave Reibstein, co-author of Marketing Metrics, agrees.

Read Reibstein’s full excerpt here about blending the art and science of marketing.

Allen Weiner of Gartner for Marketing Leaders shares three companies that he feels is blending the art and science of content marketing marvelously well. In his blog post, Understanding the Art and Science of Content Marketing, Weiner gives the thumbs up to Home Depot, Nike’s Better World micro-site and The Waffle Shop.

He says all three think like publishers in blending their content with proper workflow and outcomes. Home Depot succeeded by driving 29 million DIY-ers to a YouTube video on the forgotten art of whiskey barrel making. Many showed up in the store to buy materials and give it a go.

Nike’s Better World succeeded with its content by using HTML5 to present a scrolling storyboard explaining its company’s green initiatives and The Waffle Shop doubled connects with its customers through a live stream of customers sharing comments good or bad live at a Pittsburgh restaurant.

Is your marketing organization set up so the scientists can teach the artists and vice versus? Tell us in the comments section below.

Books Covers Use QR Codes to Increase Purchases and Page Turning

QR Code, 2-d barcode

Who says an old dog can’t learn new tricks. Zig Ziglar, 82-year old motivational maverick, salesperson, and author just published his 12th book,  Find Your Success Code: Born to Win, which features a QR Code® that takes up one third of the front cover.

Ziglar is no doubt pulling out all the stops to hit another home run just as he did nearly four decades ago with See You at the Top, which sold 1.6 million copies and is currently in its 25th edition.

Like Madonna’s tactic of staying relevant by doing duets with Brittany Spears, Christina Aguilera, Nicki Minaj, or Cee Lo Green, Ziglar is staying relevant by using today’s technology to drive his point home – find your success code. According to Publishing Perspective, QR Codes might become commonplace with publishers.

QR Code, 2-d barcodeVibe Magazine Tries to Push the Needle with QR

Last year, Vibe magazine introduced its first digital magazine, available only via a QR Code on the cover. Though the hip hop magazine had been featuring QR Codes inside for three months, this was the first time it graced the cover. Unfortunately, somebody forgot to test the code, which was without the http:// necessary for most readers to open the link in a browser.

Learn the lesson… TEST, TEST, and then RE-TEST with lots of different phones and in lots of different ways.

 

 

Other Uses of QR Beyond the Cover

If you are authoring corporate coffee table books, CEO biographies, company history books or success stories like Steve Jobs, there are many other uses of the emerging technology to consider.

Here are a few starts on how you can leverage QR codes in your publications:

  • Use a Twitter QR Code so readers are prompted to follow the author or tweet comments about the publication
  • Link to templates or applications for tracking personal improvements (think Self Help)
  • Link to a shopping list of ingredients the reader needs (think Recipe book)
  • Link to a map and describe the location (travel books)
  • Link to an audio file demonstrating pronunciation (think Language guides)
  • Link to a video demonstration how to perform what you’re describing (product guides)
  • Link to additional content relevant to the article, game, contest (think Facebook)
  • Conduct surveys, gather feedback (think readership studies on your corporate magazine)

Obviously as a marketer, uses of QR Codes are endless. If you decide to use them in your materials, here are the five golden rules.

  • Provide some instructions to the reader so they know how to use the code
  • Drive to mobile friendly content that enhances their learning
  • Include the URL in case the reader prefers to gain the information via a computer, not a mobile device
  • Add value to the reader by making the additional content relevant
  • Track the performance of your codes or what’s the point
  • Test the codes before publishing (do we really need to say why you have to test… see the Vibe comments above)

For nine more ideas on how to turn your book or magazine into a multi-media experience, visit Start a Wildfire.  Now take a 15-minute brainstorming coffee break to re-think and re-invent your existing publications and approach, just like Ziglar did.

QR Code® is a registered trademark of DensoWave.